Divertor Test Tokamak: An Italian proposal to pave the path to Nuclear Fusion resource

Nuclear Fusion, once realized, would have the advantages to ensure sustainability and security of supply, no production of greenhouse gases, intrinsic safety; environmentally responsible. Italy plays an acknowledged role in international nuclear fusion research, strengthened in the years thanks to educational and training actions of universities and research institutions as well as to a fruitful involvement of the national industries. The proposal for the realization of a Divertor Tokamak Test Facility in Italy has been brought forward backed by the Italian Fusion scientific and technological community in the field of EU Fusion Program

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by Flavio Crisanti, Lori Gabellieri and Angelo Antonio Tuccillo, ENEA

DOI 10.12910/EAI2017-035

 

Energy demand is expected to more than double by 2050 as a consequence of the combined effect of the increase in population and energy consumption per capita in developing countries. Energy sources that can prove their long-term sustainability and security of supply must replace fossil fuels. The solution to the energy problem can only come by a portfolio of options that include improvements in energy efficiency and renewable energy, nuclear fission and carbon capture and sequestration. The alternative of Nuclear Fusion, once realized, would have the advantages to ensure sustainability and security of supply (fuels are widely available and virtually unlimited), no production of greenhouse gases, intrinsic safety (as no chain-reaction is possible); environmentally responsible: no generation of radioactive waste and, with a proper choice of materials for the reaction chamber, the produced radioactivity would decay in a few tens of years. With the strong impulse given by an energy policy driven by the reduction of CO2 emissions, fusion could realize its first demonstrative plant (DEMO) in the second half of this century and give a strong contribution for the base power load towards the beginning of the new century.  …